Scholars

SCHOLARS
These students are ready to start setting and accomplishing academic goals, taking on a more personalized focus for their academic and personal development. This is where students (guided by parents, teachers, and mentors) learn  to identify personalized goals and the direction for their education.

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Group time is focused on exploring cause and effect, reason, and the rational world. Each independent study subject (science, math, language arts) has a group study topic to inspire and exemplify, time to work independently on their personal goals, and time to share with the group.

Special attention is given to developing the student’s ability to learn from inspiration, developing a personal relationship with their creator, and helping the student delineate what their purpose is and how they will meaningfully impact the world around them.

Printable Resources

Students, Parents, Teacher, Mentors, Leaders.. the Education Restoration Revolution has begun!



Student Leadership Activity Instruction Sheet HERE



The 3 Step Plan HERE


 

 

Heart Mind Might Strength
AQ – Adversity Quotient IQ – Intelligence Quotient EQ – Emotional Quotient WQ – Will Quotient
strong moral character and relationship with family a lifelong love of learning and academic proficiency confidence in talents needed to reach one’s full potential self-government and personal responsibility
I am learning the potential my parents see in me. I see the lessons we can learning from the events of history. Knowledge is wisdom applied. Learning to recognize and encourage the value in others. I am learning how to apply my faith. Start recall at the open of the day. Learning the skills necessary to accomplish my goals and fulfill my parent’s expectations.

I am learning to create my own challenges and find my own solutions.

I am learning to do my own research and how to comprehend what I see.

I am learning about agency, consequences & rewards.

I am learning how to receive input and adjust my actions and assignments.

I’m learning how to set my own personal improvement goals.

I am learning to work independently.

Learning to serve with my talents and choose how to use my time wisely.

I am an important member of my family and work to do my part and more in my home.

I am learning how to be healthy.

Junior Scholars

 

During the next few years children learn how to seek, recognize, and obey. The Junior Scholars Group is the introductory stage where children start to be ready for self-governed independent work. These students still learn as a group, but also have time to work on their self-paced studies. Many experts say to avoid quantifying these stages by ages because each child is different and moves through their development at their own pace, depending on the environment within which they are learning. In a very general sense the students at this stage are often nine to twelve years old.

 

Students are ready to attend the Junior Scholar Group when they are confident, independent readers with basic foundational arithmetic skills. Students are able to transition between group activities and then are able to follow written instructions independently. These students can follow through with instructions sent from home and have a desire to accomplish parent set goals.

 

In this stage, focus is on feeding a child’s mind with the best information and experiences. Then they have the important opportunity to learn sensitivity to the spiritual nature of things. Students spend their time learning the facts, science and logic of their world. Children then learn to seek, recognize, and obey divine direction by praying to receive answers and help. Children in this group are figuring out what they believe and how to act for themselves. These children start to study their scriptures personally (in addition to family scripture study) and keep their own journals. Children learn through parables, symbols, object lessons, and recognizing patterns.

 

This group still requires guidance from parents, to identify goals and the direction for their education.  A goal planner or journal becomes an extremely valuable tool at this phase. Students participate in the full breadth of foundational academics as well as enrichment activities or elective classes their parents approve. The majority of time as a group is led by a teacher whose role is to inspire the students. These students have scheduled time to practice working independently on their self-paced goals and also time to share their discoveries and excitement for what they are learning.

 

At this stage, goal planning can happen at home or with the support of a group leader. During monthly goal planning meetings, parents set goals for their children to accomplish that month. Parents regularly check progress at home.  They encourage students to practice greater independence at home while applying group time learning to experiences in the home.

 

Students benefit from having a more consistent environment. Having a familiar schedule brings peace because the children know what to expect. When a student understands the benefits of good behavior, accomplishing their goals and working diligently, they develop a desire to be productive.

 

The areas of focus for the Junior Scholars classes are:

Heart – Learn the potential parents see in the student. Students learn how to recognize their own potential.  Learn to recognize the value in others. Learn from the events and communities in history. Learn about how to apply knowledge and build wisdom. Learn to apply my faith. Start practicing recall.

Mind – Learn the skills necessary to accomplish my goals and fulfill my parent’s expectations. Learn about eternal concepts like agency and other vital knowledge.

Might – Learn to accomplish goals and learn from parental input. Learn to serve with talents and choose how to use time wisely. Learn to work independently.

Strength – Students recognize they are an important member of their family and work to do their part and more at home. Learn how to be healthy.

 

 

Heart Mind Might Strength
AQ – Adversity Quotient IQ – Intelligence Quotient EQ – Emotional Quotient WQ – Will Quotient
strong moral character and relationship with family a lifelong love of learning and academic proficiency confidence in talents needed to reach one’s full potential self-government and personal responsibility
I am learning how to prepare for my unique purpose and mission.

I am learning to become a purpose driven and faithful servant leader.

I am learning to apply knowledge and wisdom.

I plan my goals.

I am learning the knowledge necessary to accomplish my goals and live my purpose.

I am learning true principles of liberty and how to apply them.

I am learning to discern between truth and error.

I am learning to honor my family heritage with my decisions.

I am learning skills and talents necessary to live my purpose.

I review my goals and my work with my parents.

Learning to take care of my physical needs and to serve others. Developing the ability to be diligent and focused in my work without being reminded.

Senior Scholars

 

Next are the Critical Years.11 Often called the Scholar Phase,47 or the Spirit Stage, at American Family Education this the Senior Scholars group. Here foundations are laid to transition from group learning to a more independent and purely self-directed learning path. This group often attends for only one to three years before children grow out of this educational program. This pattern of self direction will continue throughout their life as they move on to live their purpose. This is the time for specific mission preparation. A mission is the full capacity of a life dedicated to the service of God.

 

Students are ready for this group when they are mature enough to take a more active role in setting their own goals and the direction of their education and seek additional learning opportunities on their own. They show this by achieving and excelling the goals their parents have set and they no longer need to be reminded in order to accomplish these goals. Academic study is deeper and more detailed than in the Junior Scholar Group. Parents and mentors support and encourage as the student practices directing his own academic path and pace. During mentoring sessions and goal planning, parents either approve or offer additional guidance for the goals set by the student. At home, parents review progress and direction with the student regularly.

 

Each of you are given situations, talents and challenges necessary to achieve your individual mission. It is especially powerful when the student voluntarily chooses to participate in educational experiences that build the skills and character needed to achieve their individual goals. At this level students are seeking truth by questioning and asking, “Who am I?” These students need time to contribute and to ponder. It is a time to develop talents, and to learn and overcome weaknesses.

 

Special attention is given to developing the student’s ability to learn from inspiration, developing a personal relationship with God, and helping the student delineate what their purpose is.  They will also define how they will meaningfully impact the world around them. These children need to measure everything against the word of God. As the world pushes further away from moral absolutes, these students are building a foundation of character that can be strong in that storm.

 

Students at the Senior Scholar level have frequent opportunities to serve their fellow students and their community. Being at this developmental level qualifies students to be elected into student government roles where they can hold a variety of responsibilities based on the needs of their local group and community. These could include opportunities to teach younger groups, planning activities and engage in service projects. At this level it is encourage that these students also have time with the group to do deeper study on subjects of leadership and personal responsibility. See example leadership roles in the resources section at the end of this book.

 

The areas of focus for the Senior Scholar Group are:

Heart – Students learn their unique purpose and mission. Learn how to become a purpose driven and faithful servant leader. Learn how to apply knowledge. Daily recall time.

Mind – Learning the knowledge necessary to accomplish personal goals. Learn true principles of liberty and how to apply them. Learn to discern between truth and error.

Might – Learn to set personal goals and honor family heritage. Learn the skills and talents necessary to live their unique and divine purpose.

Strength – Learn to take care of my physical needs and to serve others. Develop the ability to be diligent and focused.

 

Students are ready to graduate to the next level when they have completed three things:

  1. Completed the chosen curriculum (chosen by self/parents/guardians),
  2. Demonstrated academic proficiency with equal to at least freshman in college level on a diagnostic test
  3. Completed their Thesis on Purpose, showing their clear understanding of their worth and purpose.

 

Please note that the minimums detailed here are especially designed for a student who has just one or two years to accomplish this level of education before moving into adulthood or their personal mission phase.

 

The first graduation requirement is completing the chosen curriculum. Choosing curriculum is based on the expectations of the parents who set the categories or depth required for the student to accomplish. For math it is recommended that the student accomplish at least the chosen portion of the recommended math guides to allow the student an opportunity to build logical reasoning skills and the ability to self govern through Math. For language arts, completing at least 30 academic service projects which will give the student an introduction as well as some good practice communicating with a heart of service. For science, creating at least one science journal on a discipline chosen for study gives the student practice researching, studying their scriptures and creating a comprehensive and useful journal.

 

The second graduation requirement is to display academic proficiency a student can take a diagnostic test. These were reviewed in Chapter 2 under The Best Tools section. A student, scoring as a freshman in college or higher on a diagnostic test can be confident in their academic foundation. Depending on the path for the student, there are different expectations for the level of excellence each student demonstrates in each discipline. One of the benefits of this philosophy is that a student who is proficient in any subject of study before being qualified to graduate, can work on more specialized or advanced studies during their independent study time.

 

The third requirement is for the student to write a thesis on their individual purpose in narrative form. This document is written using references from experiences and things learned during academic, elective, and life experiences. The Thesis on Purpose is a serious literary undertaking with the intent to summarize a student’s personal purpose- their potential, passion, and profit. The basic structure of this thesis should include a title page, an abstract, a table of contents, body (introduction, findings, etc.), and a bibliography. The body of this work will outline the specific mission or purpose the student has discovered through the process of regular goal planning and seeking a purpose driven, leadership education. Resources will include classes they have attended, books read, events that made a personal impact, and insight gained during their studies. Thoughts and impressions recorded during recall will be an invaluable resource. The thesis will answer questions such as: What are your talents? What could you be the best in the world at? How did you develop your talents or potential? What are your passions? How did you discover that passion? What will you do to add value to the marketplace? The quality of this document will reflect the maturity of the student and their academic development. The greatest benefit is to the student who has written an organized report of who they see themselves being as a purpose driven leader.

 

These Senior Scholar students “graduate” from this developmental level when they have developed their foundational knowledge and skills. When students have a clearly defined purpose, core proficiencies of the intrinsic values, and an idea of the legacy they would like to create, it is time to seek outside mentorship and move to the Misson Phase.
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